Courses

6.775 CMOS Analog and Mixed-Signal Circuit Design

Professors H. S. Lee and Charles Sodini

A detailed exposition of the principles involved in designing and optimizing analog and mixed-signal circuits in CMOS technologies. Small-signal and large-signal models. Systemic methodology for device sizing and biasing. Basic circuit building blocks. Operational amplifier design. Large signal considerations. Principles of switched capacitor networks including switched-capacitor and continuous-time integrated filters. Basic and advanced A/D and D/A converters, delta-sigma modulators, RF and other signal processing circuits. Design projects on op amps and subsystems are a required part of the subject. 4 Engineering Design Points.

11.S942  Regional Innovation Systems

Dr. Elisabeth B. Reynolds

This course provides students an empirical and theoretically grounded understanding of the concept of regional innovation systems (RIS), how and why they emerge, and conversely, why they might not. The RIS concept has become one of the primary models in regions and countries for understanding and promoting economic growth, in part as a response to globalization and the increased economic competition that local and regional communities face. This has led to a plethora of policies and programs focused on building regional capabilities that support and enhance an “innovation ecosystem.”

14.193 Advanced Seminar in Economics

Professor Michael J. Piore

Reading and discussion of current topics in economics. Open to advanced graduate students by arrangement with individual members of the staff.

14.781J |15.678J | 17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy

Professors Michael J. Piore and Suzanne Berger

Critical analysis of liberal, neoclassical, and Marxist perspectives on modern society. Alternative theories of economic growth, historical change, the state, classes, and ideology.

15.678J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy

Professors Michael J. Piore and Suzanne Berger

Critical analysis of liberal, neoclassical, and Marxist perspectives on modern society. Alternative theories of economic growth, historical change, the state, classes, and ideology.

17.148 Political Economy of Globalization

Professor Suzanne Berger

Analyzes the impact of trade and financial flows and regional integration on the domestic politics of advanced industrial states. Pressures for harmonization and convergence of domestic institutions and practices and the sources of national resistance to these are examined. Cases are drawn from both the advanced economies and developing countries.

17.195/6 Globalization

Professor Suzanne Berger

Analyzes changes in the international economy and their effects in the politics, economy, and society of advanced and emerging countries. Topics include the independence of national governments; wage inequality; unemployment; industrial production outside national borders and its consequences for innovation, efficiency, and jobs; fairness in trade; and mass culture versus local values. 17.195 fulfills undergraduate public policy requirement in the major and minor. Graduate students are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.

17.198 Current Topics in Comparative Political Economy

Professor Suzanne Berger

Analyzes and compares approaches in current political economy literatures. Weekly topics are selected by instructor and participants. Examples include the organization of interests, industrial policy, growth and inequality, resource "curse", late development. Topics vary each year depending on the research interests of the seminar participants. The subject is for graduate students in social sciences with previous coursework in political economy.

22.812J, ESD.163J Managing Nuclear Technology

Professor Richard K. Lester

Examines current economic, management, and policy issues concerning nuclear power and its fuel cycle. Introduces methods for analyzing private and public policy alternatives, including discounted cash flow methods and other techniques in engineering economics. Application to specific problem areas, including nuclear waste management, weapons proliferation, and the economic competitiveness of nuclear power. Other topics include deregulation and restructuring in the electric power industry.